Top 5 Amazing Hybrid Animals


5. Zebroid = Zebra + Equine

A zebroid (also zebra mule and zebrule) is the offspring of any cross between a zebra and any other equine: essentially, a zebra hybrid. In most cases, the sire is a zebra stallion. Offspring of a donkey sire and zebra mare, called a zebra hinny, do exist but are rare. Zebroids have been bred since the 19th century.The zebroid showed in the picture above, Eclyse, is a very unusual one, because of her coloring. With her ├╝ber distinct makings, it’s really hard not think she’s a Photoshop mock-up.

4. Liger = Lion + Tiger

The liger is a hybrid cross between a male Panthera leo (lion), and a female Panthera tigris (Tiger) and is denoted scientifically as Panthera tigris × Panthera leo. A liger resembles a giant lion with diffused stripes. They are the largest cats in the world, although the Siberian Tiger is the largest pure sub-species. Like tigers, but unlike lions, ligers enjoy swimming. A similar hybrid, the offspring of a male tiger and a female lion is called a tigon.
3. Beefalo = Buffalo + Cow

What do you get when you cross a cow with a buffalo? The Beefalo, a hybrid animal that produces red meat lower in fat and cholesterol than beef. Most consumers have never heard of beefalo, let alone tasted it, and only a few Seattle grocery stores carry it.
How does a buffalo burger compare to a beef one? “It has a richer flavor and it’s milder and sweeter than beef,” says Ellensburg beefalo breeder Mark Merril, “and more juicy.”
2. Cama = Camel + Llama

This hybrid animal, the product of breeding a llama and a camel, has been the only creature of this kind since her birth in 1995. Camas are humpless and have the long fluffy coat of a llama. Their ears are half way in length between camels and llamas, but they have the strong, desert-ready legs of a camel.
1. Leopon = Leopard + Lion

The Leopon is the result of breeding a male leopard with a female lion. The head of the animal is similar to that of a lion while the rest of the body carries similarities to leopards. The first documented leopon was bred at Kolhapur, India in 1910.
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